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Resources for ADHD: Home

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The following guide is for informational purposes only and not intended to diagnose or give medical advice.

What is ADHD?

ADHD is one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders of childhood. It is usually first diagnosed in childhood and often lasts into adulthood. People with ADHD may have trouble paying attention, controlling impulsive behaviors (may act without thinking about what the result will be), or be overly active.

In 1994, doctors decided all forms of attention-deficit disorder would be called "attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder," or ADHD, even if the person wasn't hyperactive.

(CDC, https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/adhd/facts.html; WebMD, https://www.webmd.com/add-adhd/childhood-adhd/add-vs-adhd)

Types of ADHD

  • ADHD predominantly inattentive presentation (what used to be called ADD)
  • ADHD predominantly hyperactive-impulsive presentation 
  • ADHD combined presentation (both inattentive and hyperactive-impulsive symptoms)

(WebMD, https://www.webmd.com/add-adhd/childhood-adhd/add-vs-adhd)

Symptoms of ADHD

ADHD Inattentive Type Symptoms

  • Doesn’t pay close attention to details or makes careless mistakes in school or job tasks.
  • Has problems staying focused on tasks or activities, such as during lectures, conversations or long reading.
  • Does not seem to listen when spoken to (i.e., seems to be elsewhere).
  • Does not follow through on instructions and doesn’t complete schoolwork, chores or job duties (may start tasks but quickly loses focus).
  • Has problems organizing tasks and work (for instance, does not manage time well; has messy, disorganized work; misses deadlines).
  • Avoids or dislikes tasks that require sustained mental effort, such as preparing reports and completing forms.
  • Often loses things needed for tasks or daily life, such as school papers, books, keys, wallet, cell phone and eyeglasses.
  • Is easily distracted.
  • Forgets daily tasks, such as doing chores and running errands. Older teens and adults may forget to return phone calls, pay bills and keep appointments.

ADHD Hyperactive/impulsive type

  • Fidgets with or taps hands or feet, or squirms in seat.
  • Not able to stay seated (in classroom, workplace).
  • Runs about or climbs where it is inappropriate.
  • Unable to play or do leisure activities quietly.
  • Always “on the go,” as if driven by a motor.
  • Talks too much.
  • Blurts out an answer before a question has been finished (for instance may finish people’s sentences, can’t wait to speak in conversations).
  • Has difficulty waiting his or her turn, such as while waiting in line.
  • Interrupts or intrudes on others (for instance, cuts into conversations, games or activities, or starts using other people’s things without permission). Older teens and adults may take over what others are doing.

ADHD Combined Type

  • Symptoms of both inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity.

(American Psychiatric Association, https://www.psychiatry.org/patients-families/adhd/what-is-adhd)

                      ADD / ADHD in Teens and Adults - Sanctuary Counseling

 1,850 Adhd Adult Stock Photos, Pictures & Royalty-Free Images - iStock

Treatments for ADHD

Behavior Therapy

Behavior therapy teaches children and their families how to strengthen positive child behaviors and eliminate or reduce unwanted or problem behaviors.

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

It’s based on the idea that negative actions or feelings are the results of current distorted beliefs or thoughts, not unconscious forces from the past. CBT is a blend of cognitive therapy and behavioral therapy. Cognitive therapy focuses on your moods and thoughts. Behavioral therapy specifically targets actions and behaviors.

Schema Therapy

Schema therapy is a newer type of therapy that combines elements of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), psychoanalysis, attachment theory, and emotion-focused therapy, among others. In schema therapy, you’ll work with a therapist to uncover and understand your schemas, sometimes called early maladaptive schemas. Schema therapy aims to teach you how to ensure your emotional needs are met in a healthy way that doesn’t cause distress.

Medication

Stimulants

These medicines might help you focus your thoughts and ignore distractions. Stimulant meds work for 70% to 80% of people. They’re used to treat moderate and severe ADHD.

Non-stimulants

In cases where stimulants don’t work or cause unpleasant side effects, non-stimulants might help. These medications can improve symptoms like concentration and impulse control.

 

(CDC, https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/adhd/treatment.html; CDC, https://www.cdc.gov/childrensmentalhealth/parent-behavior-therapy.html; Healthline, https://www.healthline.com/health/depression/cognitive-behavioral-therapy; Healthline, https://www.healthline.com/health/schema-therapy-2; WebMD, https://www.webmd.com/add-adhd/adhd-medication-chart)

McFarlin Books about ADHD

McFarlin Databases about Health

For a comprehensive list of McFarlin databases consult our A-Z Database List. Databases may require you sign into the library system before viewing; you will be automatically prompted if a login is necessary.

Getting Help

You may want to get help for ADHD if it begins to interfere with your ability to function, such as eat, study, and have fun. TU has counselors who would love to help you.

This site provides information about and contact information for TU's Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS).

If you are having a mental health crisis, the following sites provide help:

 

Call or text 988 - Oklahoma's statewide mental health lifeline